Bill Doskoch: Media, BPS*, Film, Minutiae

Curated knowledge, trenchant insights & witty bon mots

Top terrorism books

If you're looking for some light reading on those who would like western society to implode or explode, whichever's easiest, terrorism expert Peter Bergen prepared a list of books for the Washington Post: Here's some titles (all prices in US dollars): Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the […]

more... »

Mon, November 22 2004 » * Big Picture Stuff, Main Page » Comments Off on Top terrorism books

Interview with Imperial Hubris author

This is a bit late to the blog. Michael Scheuer — who wrote the jeremiad Imperial Hubris — has resigned from the CIA. 60 Minutes did an interview with him on Nov. 14. Here's the scary stuff: “You've written no one should be surprised when Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda detonate a weapon of […]

more... »

Mon, November 22 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off on Interview with Imperial Hubris author

Who lost Ohio?

This is a lengthy NYT magazine article about the battle for Ohio. In some ways, Kerry did very well there, but here's why it wasn't good enough: Why wasn't it enough? In the days that followed, theories circulated claiming that Republicans had stolen votes from Kerry by messing with the results from electronic voting machines. […]

more... »

Mon, November 22 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off on Who lost Ohio?

Slavery by another name in the games industry

Here's an excerpt from an NYT story by Randall Stross about the inhuman grind at Electronic Arts Inc., the world's leading manufacturer of interactive electronic games: HARLES DICKENS himself would shudder, I should think, were he to see the way young adults are put to work in one semimodern corner of our economy. Gas lamps are long […]

more... »

Mon, November 22 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off on Slavery by another name in the games industry

Whatever happened to the Powell doctrine?

Author Mark Danner compares the Vietnam-era Colin Powell with the current team player, analyzes the Iraq situation and then brings us to 1992's Powell Doctrine: Here's an excerpt from the NYT article: No one can say how many lives could have been saved had the responsible officials asked the right questions. As it happens, those […]

more... »

Mon, November 22 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off on Whatever happened to the Powell doctrine?