Bill Doskoch: Media, BPS*, Film, Minutiae

Curated knowlege, trenchant insights & witty bon mots

Great tsunami interactives

The BBC and the Guardian both have interesting interactives showing how the tsunamis developed. If you come across any other cool interactives, please leave a note below. [ /30 ] For those of you who read the post and didn't roast my ass for spelling tsunami 'tsumani',  I wish you good karma in 2005. :)

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page » 2 Comments

Yet more Auld Lang-Syne-ing about blogs

The BBC also did a section in its year-in-review on blogs. I use the story as an opportunity to do some opining of my own. First things first. The last two paragraphs of the BBC story might well be the most salient: In any case, as bloggers rarely go out and about, many of those who […]

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off

BBC reporters reflect on Africa in 2004

Four BBC journalists look back on the year that was in Africa: The good, bad and amusing news. They also try to identify the emerging news from there in 2005. An excerpt; it is Mohammed Allie's pick for most amusing story from South Africa: One of the most bizarre tales this year, was in South […]

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off

The bright side of Chechnya, in photos

A BBC journalist, who is Chechen, has put together a photo essay to try and show the human side of her damned little republic. Here is the introduction: My name is Sapiet. I am a Chechen journalist working for the BBC. In 1994 I came to Moscow to finish my thesis, but two months later […]

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off

How can we improve medical reporting?

The Globe and Mail’s Andre Picard, an award-winning public health journalist and author, has written a useful article on how to make medical reporting better. However, substitute the word  ‘health’ or ‘medical’ for virtually another other beat, and the advice would still be valid.

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page, Media » Comments Off

<em>Only</em> three hours per day? Dilettantes.

This NYT story talks about a new U.S. survey which finds that the average U.S. Internet user spends about three hours per day online — a block of time which is cutting into (gasp!) TV watching and other recreational pursuits. An excerpt: AN FRANCISCO, Dec. 29 – The average Internet user in the United States spends […]

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off

Poor, pissed off (and pissed on) in China

This NYT article tells an interesting story about the gowing social instability in China over the ever-widening gap between rich and poor — one exacerbated by corruption and cronyism. Welcome to capitalism, folks! An excerpt: ANZHOU, China, Dec. 24 – The encounter, at first, seemed purely pedestrian. A man carrying a bag passed a husband […]

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off

Rating Canada's political columnists

Just saw this at Ianking.ca:  This Magazine's blog ranks Canada's political columnists — I'm presuming it's a collectivist effort. :) Here's the top of the class: Chantal Hebert:A+She's easily the best political writer in the country right now, in French and English Paul Wells: AGives people a reason to buy Macleans. Has one of the few […]

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off

Has the reader well for magazines been drained?

CTV colleague and fellow blogger David Akin posted a link to this article to CAJ-L. It's from Direct Marketing and it's about the U.S. magazine industry An excerpt: We have run out of readers in this country. You may have heard about the recent, mind-blowing study by the National Endowment for the Arts in which […]

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Fri, December 31 2004 » Main Page » Comments Off