Bill Doskoch: Media, BPS*, Film, Minutiae

Curated knowlege, trenchant insights & witty bon mots

How the social web is changing online reading

New features for Facebook and applications such as TweetDeck for Twitter, not to mention innovations such as Flipboard and Instapaper, are shifting how online news is consumed, writes Richard McManus of ReadWriteWeb.

From the posting:

One of the more subtle trends of 2010 has been the way that our reading habits have changed, due to a convergence of other Web trends: mobile apps, real-time Web (mostly Twitter), and social networking as a way to track news (mostly Facebook). In the previous era of the Web, the so-called Web 2.0, RSS Readers and start pages were all the rage. Over 2010, though, more people used tools like Twitter, Facebook, Instapaper, Flipboard, LazyWeb, Feedly and TweetDeck, to track news.

Nowadays I’m more likely to find stories to read via a vertical aggregator (the media-focusedMediagazer is my current favorite) and save them to Instapaper for later reading via my iPhone or iPad. I still use Google Reader, but in all honesty I now use it more to scan than to read.

Facebook has continued to expand beyond its original social networking purpose over 2010, including enabling people to track news and information of interest to them. In September, Facebook added a news search, by surfacing widely “liked” news stories from independent media organizations in its basic search bar.

The post noted the growth in these other areas is coming at the expense of traditional RSS readers.

It may be that we can just no longer cope with RSS Readers, with the information overload that Facebook, Twitter and others have only added to over the past year. That’s where filtering tools – like LazyWeb, Regator, Feedly, my6sense – have come into play in 2010. They aim to filter and personalize news for your tastes.

My6Sense is a favorite of several of our writers. It’s a mobile app thatfilters your RSS feeds and displays an algorithmic guess at the most important news for you. ReadWriteEnterprise writer Klint Finley said that he uses My6Sense “when I’m on my phone and looking to see if there’s anything important in my feeds.” Co-editor Marshall Kirkpatrick added that My6Sense is “just like using Google Reader (they sync up) but offers recommendations based on your past reading behavior.”

Tue, December 7 2010 » Main Page, Media